Parable of The Very good Shepherd


This is an updated version of the story as published at BibleVideos.org. Richard directed the second unit (broll) material of this title, enhancing the visual storytelling beyond a very first person telling of the story on camera.

IMG_9774 El Greco. ‘Domínikos Theotokópoulos) 1541-1614. Tolède. Le Christ chassant les marchands du Temple. Christ driving the Traders from the Temple. vers 1600. Londres. National Gallery.
El Greco. ‘Domínikos Theotokópoulos) 1541-1614. Tolède. Le Christ chassant les marchands du Temple. Christ driving the Traders from the Temple. vers 1600. Londres. National Gallery.
Maniérisme.
Cette parabole symbolise une des grandes différences d’esprit entre l’Ancien et le Nouveau Testament. La Bible judaïque n’a jamais enseigné le mépris des richesses. La richesse était considérée comme légitime, un don de Dieu. Un don que Dieu pouvait retirer certes, pour mettre à l’épreuve ses fidèles (histoire de Job). Les Evangiles rompent clairement avec cette tradition judaïque en enseignant que la richesse est un obstacle sur la voie du salut, et la pauvreté par contre, un atout.

This parable symbolizes one of the excellent differences of spirit among the Old and New Testaments. The Jewish Bible has never ever taught contempt for wealth. Wealth was considered genuine, a present from God. A present that God could undoubtedly withdraw, to test his faithful (the story of Job). The Gospels clearly break with this Jewish tradition in teaching that wealth is an obstacle on the way of salvation, and poverty on the other hand, an asset.
By jean louis mazieres on 2016-03-23 12:56:36
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4 thoughts on “Parable of The Good Shepherd”

  1. I love this Parable! Jesus is our God, Lord, Savior, and Shephard! We all are the sheep! even if there is a lost heep, God’s grace is strong enough!

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